Fairport Convention

Fairport Convention Tickets

FAIRPORT CONVENTION is rated 4.6 out of 5 by 5.
  • 2016-07-29T07:30CST
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What people are saying about Fairport Convention

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Fun but a huge promotional exercise I attended this event with three others who have all been long time fans of Fairport Convention. In fact my husband (aged 62) reckons they were the first band he ever saw as a teenager, at Wimbledon Town Hall around 1968. The concert venue - Bridport Electric Palace - is absolutely lovely, a real gem. My one complaint about the concert - and it's a major complaint - is that it was entirely to sell their latest album Myths and Legends. It was beyond a joke the number of times they referred to 'Myths and Legends is available at the foyer" etc. etc. And because they were entirely focused on promoting the album, they only played one classic track - Meet on the Ledge - and that was only after the encore. Come on guys, spare a thought for fans who have bought many of your albums and don't expect to attend a concert that's nothing but a PR exercise to sell the latest CD. That aspect was a huge disappointment.
Date published: 2016-02-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Like touching a Legend Small intimate venue with barely enough room on the stage for the band. But this made the gig all the more personal. Like having your favourite folk band playing in your front room.
Date published: 2016-05-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lovely music in a lovely setting Great to see Fairport playing new songs from their new album, Myths and Heroes, as well as old favourites. They do it so well.
Date published: 2016-02-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The band just get better, fabulous music and wonderful banter and fun! The Electric Palace is a really amazing venue, and suits Fairport perfectly. We all had a great evening
Date published: 2016-03-06
Rated 5 out of 5 by from FAIRPORT AT BRIDPORT This band is perfect. I think they've always had perfection at the core of what they've been about ever since meeting at that North London surgery back in 1967. Blimey. 1967. At the dawn of Heavy Metal and all stadium sellout tours. I saw them in 68 when I was 18. Simon was the first person to speak then and announced their first song, as he was indeed at the Electric Cinema at Bridport. This time it was,"Twenty Sixteen? Really? What happened? How long was I out for?" The crowd were, as I expected, mostly, and gratifyingly, longtime aficionados; they were seeing old friends in a friendly setting. In fact Bridport has a very happy vibe; I feel it every time I visit. But after this gig I just wanted to live there. Being familiar with a name, and brandishing, insufficient phrases like 'Folk Rock', does nothing to describe any sort of music, be it folk or rock or anything. But someone had to come up with something, hearing Matty Groves sung with passion and punch. And Richard Thompson played a Les Paul. Anyway... beware of clichés, especially the ones that attend all the sideswipes at Folk: fingers in ears, pints of nasty bitter and basically a musical interlude at a steam rally. You get the picture; folk music has been getting nothing but respect from the band ever since Ashley got them sorting out the good stuff all those years ago. The words are precise and the language is spare. Bob Dylan cited their versions of his demos as the best. Sorry this is taking so long, if you're still here, but I knew I'd like the music, I just didn't realise how totally, how completely Fairport had evolved this way of making music: singing these stories which belong to all of us; they've been telling us how good they were ever since Leige and Lief. They honour this poetry of the poor and the lovelorn with music that is so fine and meticulous that it gives them a proper place to rest. It's music that's full of love. And you don't get a lot of that these days. They are a really happy ensemble. I might be wrong; there might be unseemly fights backstage over the vol-au-vents, but I don't think so. The between song banter is funny enough to remember; some rehearsed, but too good effect, especially the naming and shaming of Maddy Prior, the clearer of many a festival buffet table. There are too many high points; the one abiding memory is the genuine ego-free genius of Dave Pegg's singing and bass playing. That applies to them all: Ric Sanders' fiddle and the mandolin and vocals of Chris Leslie. Gerry Conway is one ace of a drummer. Never noisy, following the songs like a needle stitching a hem. Whatever that means. I sometimes think that people who have been in bands for a hundred years must be really unhappy, trotting out the old hits for a familiar bored crowd... Discussing golf handicaps with their dull old roadies. That might be the case for Bill Wyman, or maybe even Rod the Mod. But you feel as though these guys are living life right. They went down a storm, by the way, supported by a charismatic and drily witty Roger Davis. He joined them on stage for the inevitable encore, 'Meet On The Ledge'. The house demolition complete; they left the stage to get ready for the drive to Liverpool, to see more of their friends. Do see this band. That's an order. ps Simon : "You can tell it's a folk tune, it's got nineteen verses and two chords. If it had nineteen chords and two verses it would be a Steely Dan song."
Date published: 2016-03-09
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