The Man in the White Suit

Wyndham's Theatre, London

 

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THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT is rated 5.0 out of 5 by 1.
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More information about The Man in the White Suit tickets

  • Join an incredible cast, including Stephen Mangan (Episodes, Jeeves and Wooster), Kara Tointon (Eastenders, Pygmalion) and Sue Johnston (The Royle Family, Downton Abbey) for the World Premiere of the hilarious, classic Ealing comedy, The Man in the White Suit this autumn.

    Adapted and directed by the double Olivier award-winning Sean Foley, this fast-paced comedy tells the story of Sidney Stratton (Stephen Mangan) who invents a fabric that never gets dirty and never wears out!

    With textile manufacturers and trade unions up in arms what will become of our plucky hero and his controversial invention? Can Daphne (Kara Tointon) the mill owner?s daughter save him? Or will it be game over for The Man in the White Suit?

    Featuring a cast of fourteen, original songs from Charlie Fink (Noah and the Whale), dazzling choreography by Lizzie Gee, plus dizzying flying effects, epic bouts of clog-dancing, a spectacular set from Michael Taylor and scintillating sound effects and incidental music by Ben and Max Ringham, The Man in the White Suit bursts on to the London stage for a strictly limited season from 27 September.

    Please Note: Stephen Mangan will not be appearing w/c 23rd December 2019

    Booking Period: 25th September 2019 to 11th January 2020

    Running Time: To be confirmed

    Age Restriction: To be confirmed

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What people are saying about The Man in the White Suit

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Perfect chemistry at Theatre Royal Bath Out goes the austerely brilliant, single-minded but socially inept chemist of Alec Guinness in the famous 1951 source film; in comes an on stage Fifties rock 'n roll band breaking the fourth wall, a clog dance and - most essentially - the gormless but loveable scientific genius portrayed by Stephen Mangan, with his wacky chemistry set, sparks flying, bubbling sound effects and long chain molecule polymers. You might quip that everything in this show depends upon Mangan's character bonding with the audience and setting off an explosive chain reaction of laughs (groan). I can report that that is exactly what Mangan achieves - magnificently. He is a first rate comic actor, with terrific energy and stage presence in a hugely demanding - but no doubt huge fun to perform - central role, involving as it does a skedaddle along an almost constant production line of comic business, jokes and timing. One expects the kitchen sink to make an appearance any minute from the flies, so prolific and inventive is the flow of comic ideas, new and old, in Sean Foley's capable directorial hands. (A superb routine in which his character has been tranquilized, sees Mangan rapidly switching accents numerous times, whilst also at one point doing a Michael Jackson Moon Walk.) Mangan's toothy smile and his character's clumsy but earnest naivete had me thinking of that earlier Ealing comedian and Variety artist, George Formby; one Ealing man hands on comedy to another Ealing man it seems, contrary to Larkin's gloomy line about what we humans inherit through the generations. The clever set provides several delightful surprises and coups de theatre, including: a hair-raising drive in a 1950s open top sports car; a wonderfully funny dance routine between a very seductive Kara Tointon and Mangan's helpless innocent, followed by Mangan abseiling his escape down the ingeniously produced effect of a very high wall; and finally a cartoonish chase sequence through an LS Lowry style northern townscape. Is there still room in all this fast paced farce for the satire of the original film, with its early post war messages about consumerism and the vested interests of workers and management versus Brave New World scientific progress in producing goods which never wear out and repel Nature's destructive forces? The answer is in the affirmative. In the second half of the show, the satirical theme becomes far stronger than it is in the midst of all the knock-about fun of the first half. The dubious ethics of large petro-chemical giants get a mention, as do bang up to date digs at politicians who dare propose to flout the law of the land and to prorogue Parliament for party advantage (the audience laughed with recognition at the topicality). With so much of the playing in breathless, high gear comedy, the tragic overtones of the famous scene at the film's end, in which things literally fall apart for our hero, are largely lost, but I forgive that lapse. By then, I've had so much redeeming fun I am persuaded that what will survive of us is laughter (*pace* again to the late Mr P Larkin). Thoroughly, thoroughly recommended, so watch out for the West End transfer after Bath and make a run for it.
Date published: 2019-09-15
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