The Boys

Performing: The Boys

The Cluny, Newcastle Upon Tyne

This event is for over 18s only - No refunds will be issued for under 18s.

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GENERAL ADMISSION £11.00 (£10.00) Transaction fee applicable *

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More information about The Boys tickets

THE BOYS have just released their long-requested first new studio album since 1981 on Wolverine Records. Featuring the original founder members and creative core of Matt DangerfieldCasino Steel and Honest John Plain, the new album “Punk Rock Menopause” is packed with13 iconic new songs bearing the band’s classic trademark blistering guitars, hard-edged melodies, killer hooks and layered harmonies.

 

Along with the Sex Pistols, Clash and the Damned, The Boys were part of the first wave of the mid-1970’s UK punk explosion.  Armed with an arsenal of killer Steel/Dangerfield songs The Boys became the first UK punk band to sign an album deal in January 1977.  Highly regarded by the music press and their contemporaries, their well-crafted songs, together with Steel and Dangerfield’s layered harmonies, led to them being described as ‘The Beatles of Punk’ but they could (and should) just as deservedly have been heralded as the English Ramones - fast, alternately brattish and tongue-in-cheek, and gloriously anthemic.

 

As Last FM puts it: “The Boys made arguably one of the best LPs of the 70s with their self-titled first album and provided the template for superior Pop Punk before even the Buzzcocks had got out of first gear”.

 

Matt Dangerfield had converted his rented basement flat in Maida Vale into a home recording studio.  47A Warrington Crescent became extremely important in the development of the UK punk scene in the mid seventies.  Mick Jones, Tony James, Brian James, Rat Scabies, Gene October, Sid Vicious and Billy Idol were regular visitors.  Amongst others, the Sex Pistols, The Damned, London SS, The Clash, Chelsea, Generation X and of course, The Boys, made their first recordings there.  In this hotbed of creativity Steel and Dangerfield quickly struck up a prolific songwriting partnership.

 

The Boys were born in September 1975 when singer/guitarist Matt Dangerfield left Mick Jones and Tony James’s fledgling punk band London SS to form a new band with ex-Hollywood Brats songwriter/keyboard player Casino Steel.  Dangerfield’s art college friend, guitarist Honest John Plain, was soon recruited. The following year they held auditions for the bass and drum roles with Kid Reid and Jack Black completing the line-up. 
 
The Boys made their debut at London’s Hope and Anchor Pub in October 1976.  Mick Jones, Billy Idol, Joe Strummer, Tony James and Gene October were all present and the pub was packed for The Boys performance.  They became the first punk band to sign an album deal when they were snapped up by NEMS in January 1977. 

 

Having released two albums and three singles with NEMS, they moved to Safari in 1979 where two further albums and five more singles followed. Throughout their career The Boys always had more success overseas than in their home country.

 

Every Christmas they rearranged the ‘B’ and the ‘Y’ and became The Yobs, releasing the classic “The Yobs Christmas Album” in 1980.

 

Over the last three decades The Boys’ songs have been covered by countless bands, with substantial sales from Argentina to Germany and Japan.

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